• As the UK’s coal-free streak comes to an end, Amy Harder at Axios points out that the island nation’s energy outlook isn’t so rosy. The fact is, the UK has largely displaced coal with natural gas. Even the Axios article is a bit deceptive: it shows a graph of carbon emissions starkly declining along with coal, and then points out that natural gas still causes greenhouse gas emissions. The point is, carbon and methane are both potent greenhouse gases.  In fact, the warming effect of methane is far stronger, albeit with a shorter half-life.
  • Vox  makes the case that climate-saving measures must be carried out by the oil and gas industry, not individual consumers. The most effective course of action for the little guy is to engage in public action like protests. This is probably right: public action should drive regulatory changes, which in turn influence how the most polluting industries do business. Otherwise, the tragedy of the commons just keeps playing itself out. However, I think it’s important to recognize the opportunity (and necessity) for clean tech advancement in the coming years.
  • Another analysis, this time at CleanTechnica, finds that the Tesla Model 3 is a cost-effective choice compared to other EVs.
  • Staying on the topic of EVs, a report finds that e-mobility shows huge cost-saving potential in the EU. 
  • Finally, I found this thread about the pessimistic assumptions in the IEA’s EV Outlook useful: